Online Gambling Player Protection Malta's Focus

Published Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - Online-Casinos.com
Online Gambling Player Protection Malta's Focus

Online gambling is a serious business in Malta and when someone acts illegally in that industry in Malta the long arm of the law always gets its man proving that white collar crime is not tolerated on the island. An article in the Times of Malta, revealed the severity if the allegations against Swedish executive Michael Zwi Oros on charges of fraud regarding the failure of Everleaf Gaming.

Soon after the gambling firm exited the United States in 2012 payment problems began developing. Now another executive from the defunct firm has been arrested Malta’s official online-gambling regulators body, the Lotteries and Gaming Authority of Malta announced.

The allegations state that the Everleaf owners let the online gaming company collapse while owing about €800,000 in not refunded player deposits to former players of the site, mostly from the United States, and the company also owed as much as €100,000 to the Maltese government in unpaid taxes and licensing fees.  The misappropriation is only one of the issues facing Pavili and Zwi Oros who are also accused of attempting to relocate certain elements of corporate control offshore outside of Malta’s jurisdiction as the online gambling firm faltered late in 2012.

Zwi Oros and Pavili were released on bail and Pavili’s €900,000 worth of assets were secured by a court order. The gaming industry in Malta has conducted an interesting rebranding of its image since the shakeup this case has presented.  Changes includes both the reorganization of the LGA itself, with new officials in place.

The refocusing on player protection is evident in recent LGA announcements, new LGA head Joseph Cuschieri said after the Pavili arrest and bail hearing.  “We are committed to ensure that player funds are protected at all times,” Cuschieri continued, ”and, to this effect, the LGA will be taking concrete measures to strengthen its player protection mechanisms well beyond the benchmarks in Europe and other jurisdictions.”

 

 

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