UK Gambling Commission Fines LeoVegas €680,500

Published Wednesday, May 02, 2018 - Online-Casinos.com
UK Gambling Commission Fines LeoVegas €680,500

The UK Gambling Commission has once again brought the hammer down on another online gambling enterprise. The firm LeoVegas has been handed a fine of £600,000 (€680,500) for a failure to return funds to 11,205 customers who had made the choice to close their accounts after banning themselves from the web casino as well as 41 misleading adverts.  

LeoVegas is a Swedish mobile gambling operator and provider of online casino and sports betting services such as table games, video slots, progressive jackpots, video poker and live betting in a number of international markets. It was also charged with sending marketing material to 1,894 people who had already wanted to be excluded and it allowed 413 self-excluded customers to gamble without communicating to the patrons or applying a 24-hour rest period before more gambling was allowed.

Chief executive officer of the Gambling Commission Neil McArthur commented on the fine, “The outcome of this case should leave no one in any doubt that we will be tough with licence holders who mislead consumers or fail to meet the standards we set in our licence conditions and codes of practice. We want operators to learn the lessons from our investigations and use those lessons to raise standards.”

LeoVegas must now pay the hefty fine, as well as divest itself of any funds it received as a result of the failings, and it will be required to reimburse the Gambling Commission for costs. The financials for the first quarter from LeoVegas said it had “high ambitions for compliance” and had been working with the UK Gambling Commission on suspect violations of regulations.  “Our assessment is that the UKGC will issue fines for these violations and we have made a provision for the full amount.” “It’s good that UKGC puts increased demands on us in the gaming industry. It is an advantage for serious actors who both have the will and ambition to work in a regulated market.”

 

 

​UK

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