Illegal FIFA Online Gambling Busted In Asia

Published Monday, June 23, 2014 - Online-Casinos.com
Illegal FIFA Online Gambling Busted In Asia

A recent episode of the iconic animated show the Simpsons depicted Homer Simpson acting as a referee for the FIFA World Cup football tournament.  In the episode he is approached by a gang of bad guys that try to give Homer a million dollars if he calls a foul and lets Brazil win the game. Homer decides to be honest and not take the bribe and somehow survives the turn around with his pride intact. The reality that this funny show portrays is a very serious problem and police all over the world are doing their best to stop. Match fixing is an issue that has plagued the world of soccer since the organized games began.

Police in Macau China have uncovered two illegal FIFA World Cup betting syndicates. It was reported that the gambling syndicates have taken hundreds of millions of dollars in illegal wagers on the 2014 World Cup. The BBC new service revealed that as many as 26 people were arrested during raids in Macau. The suspects were from Hong Kong, Malaysia and the mainland and were accused of taking millions of dollars worth of illegal bets from around the world. Interpol and a series of other police forces from Hong Kong, Macau, and mainland province Guangdong have partnered to quell the illegal activity in eight Asian nations.

The Telegraph news from the U.K. and broadcaster Channel 4 have undertaken their own investigation that alleged the Ghana Football Association participation in the World Cup was rigged. The undercover agents worked on a relationship with criminals that were proposing to fix matches during the FIFA international tournament.

The recent imprisonment of two businessmen and a player convicted of plotting to fix football matches in England is an example of what those who match fix and are caught can expect. Governments all over the world need to step up efforts to stop corruption which destroys the integrity of sports everywhere.

 

 

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