CNBC Show Details 'Illegal Gambling' in USA

Published Thursday, December 10, 2009 - Online-Casinos.com

The often seen as glamorous world of gambling with the high drama in the mega stakes games and the agony of defeat, someone looses someone wins. This has been used by the writers and film makers as a money maker since the idea of gambling hit the shores of North America.

Now that venerable institution CNBC will provide an inside look at "Illegal gambling" come this December 16, 2009. The network is recognized as a world leader in business news, providing real-time financial market coverage to at least 340 million homes worldwide, including more than 95 million viewers in the USA and Canada. CNBC viewers can even manage their individual investment portfolios and gain additional information from on-air reports by accessing the CNBC web site.

"CNBC Investigates: The Big Business of Illegal Gambling" is produced by Kurtis Productions. Sharon Barrett is the Executive Producer and Mike West is the Senior Producer. Charles Schaeffer is the Executive Producer for CNBC. Ray Borelli is the Vice President of Strategic Research, Scheduling and Long Form Programming.

Melissa Francis takes viewers inside this high-stakes business that brings some people immense wealth, while others pay the ultimate price. CNBC also looks at how gambling is moving onto the Internet where it's more difficult for law enforcement track. Technology has made illegal gambling easier to access, by using computers at work or at home people can wager at any time illegal or not. CNBC interviews Jay Cohen, an entrepreneur who started a 200 million dollar offshore gambling operation and became the first US citizen to be prosecuted for running an internet bookmaking operation. This program concludes with a debate over a bill introduced by a Democrat from Washington State, Congressman Jim McDermott that would regulate and tax online card games and a Republican from Virginia, Congressman Bob Goodlatte, who has authored the current but yet to be fully enforced "The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act." It should be an interesting hour to watch to see which side of the coin comes up.

 

 

Related news

Return to Latest News