Australian Sports Bodies Unite To Preserve Sports Integrity

Published Thursday, September 09, 2010 - Online-Casinos.com

The proactive approach used by countries to preserve the integrity of their sports leagues amateur and professional is the only effective way of keeping corruption at bay.
The use of a collaborative joining of forces to combat the illegal activities has come to a critical mass of many of Australia's sporting bodies.

 
The National Rugby League, the Australian Football League, Cricket Australia and the Australian Rugby Union, will become a group among others with the same goal, to stamp out corruption in sports.

The Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports, has started an investigation into illegal betting that was revealed as 'exotic' wagering on 'micro outcomes'.

Executive director for COMPPS, Malcolm Speed, a former International Cricket Council CEO, said, "We're also looking at 'in-play' betting with online and interactive gambling,"
The purpose of the investigation is to "make professional sport in Australia bullet proof, or as close to it as possible, from corruption", Mr. Speed continued.
A coordinated effort by various agencies sharing valuable information is a key component in making illegal sports fixing a thing of the past. The problem is the fact that much of the illegal activity is transacted in cash which leaves no paper trail.

Today's technology has ways of tracking the trends and similarities, and once that information is shared the task of catching the match fixer is made much easier. The organization is watching developments in England closely, where the gambling commission  has proper legislation to give teeth to the laws on sport cheating.


Speed commented that the formation of a gambling commission was just,  "one of many options." The Director Speed also said, that one other method would be to allow sports groups to "run their own integrity and regulatory programs where they share information among the sports". He also thought wagering agencies should be more cooperative also in sharing information.

 

 

 

 

 

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